Western University GeographyWestern Social Science

Summer 2017 Course Offerings

This summer the geography courses are offered in the Distance Studies session (May 8 - July 28) and in Intersession (May 15 - June 23). Summer Calendar.

2010A Geography of Canada - Intersession

An overview of the regional geography of Canada. Topics considered may include demographics, culture, the economy, resources and environmental issues.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

2011A Ontario and the Great Lakes - Distance Studies

A detailed examination of the province as part of the Great Lakes region, with special reference to its historical development, natural resources and patterns of human and economic activity.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

2060A World Cities - Intersession

A global perspective on urbanism. In each session a selected city is used to emphasize a particular urban problem, urban spatial structure or world region.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

  • Course Outline

2090A Space Exploration - Intersession

Survey of human activity in outer space, including history of spaceflight, scientific exploration, economic and military uses of space, natural resources and hazards, legal and ethical implications, and plausible future developments.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

2131A The Natural Environment - Distance Studies

An examination of the characteristics, origins and history of selected natural environments with particular reference to North America.

Antirequisite(s): Geography 1300A/B

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

2143A Foundations of Geography of World Business - Intersession

Geographical theories of local and international trade; relationships between the location of production and flows of goods, services and factors of production among countries and regions; the geographical patterns of world commerce.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

2152F Geography of Hazards - Intersession

A survey of the methods and models used to understand human responses to hazards. The course reviews the rich tradition of hazards research in geography, particularly through the lens of social science. The course will include discussions of both so-called "natural hazards" (e.g., floods, fires, earthquakes) and "technological hazards" (e.g., nuclear technology, genetically modified organisms, terrorism, war) as examples.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.